Author Topic: Granular Sampler Background Noise Question  (Read 124 times)

Palidor

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Granular Sampler Background Noise Question
« on: September 13, 2018, 05:24:17 PM »
Hi all! New to the forums, so please excuse my initial ignorance.

I'm playing around with the granular sampler, which is amazing! However I noticed as soon as I enable it, there's some background noise. Is this because of low volume artifacts around me, and as such, is likely unavoidable without being in a completely soundproof room?

My interest lies in recording various loops into Ableton and rapidly creating a loop library. While there is the ability to fix up sounds in there after the recording, it would be much easier to minimize artifacts pre-recording.

Thanks in advance!

mario

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Re: Granular Sampler Background Noise Question
« Reply #1 on: September 13, 2018, 10:32:36 PM »
Welcome to the forum! :)

Interesting question. Do you mean as soon as you start the channel (presumably first of the granulars, #411) there is already some interference? That should not happen, even at the highest volume settings you should only hear silence.

Once you enable sampling using S2, unless you knock on it, there should not be anything apart faint and monotonous background (inherent semiconductor noise). Is that what you hear?

I don't think a soundproof room would help here, if you hear any artifacts they are either from clipping the samples - does it change with S3/S4?

If it's environmental, a repetitive sound of certain frequency (buzzing, humming), it often happens that with repeating the same sample over and over, if in sync with echo delay timing, it gets amplified. Sometimes you even won't notice it was there in the room all the time :)

The mics are sensitive enough to easily hear whisper or even breathing... but the signal processing (in this channel) is quite lo-fi, a trade-off between polyphony and precision.

Feel free to upload an example, or send me via email, so we can rule out a hardware issue (although all units have been fully tested of course, it's worth checking). Also try to reset everything (#43214321) to make sure it's not some cranked internal mixing volumes / clipping problem.


Palidor

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Re: Granular Sampler Background Noise Question
« Reply #2 on: September 14, 2018, 08:25:03 PM »
Looks like it was environmental. I tested again at home, and way less background noise (I'm thinking the mic is VERY sensitive, and was picking up even the smallest sounds from the ventilation here at work).

My only concern right now seems to be more in terms of sound quality and execution. For the sound quality, I think running the records sample throughs some plugins in Live will clean up the samples and allow me to craft them more succinctly. With regards to the execution, I'm referring more to the prevention of delay, and gaining more control over how the sound comes out. Perhaps I haven't read the docs carefully enough?

P.S. After i make a few samples, i'll upload them to the forum so people can play around with them!

mario

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Re: Granular Sampler Background Noise Question
« Reply #3 on: September 18, 2018, 05:51:42 PM »
A little post-processing surely goes a long way. For example the way granular works, it doesn't have enough CPU power for more sophisticated tricks, joining grains neatly by ramping volumes up and down at boundaries. It just stitches chunks of waveforms together, resulting in steep jumps in signal level - audible as a kind of "cracking".

Or Low-pass IIR filters (pretty much all melodic channels unless you hold SET after keying in, which will switch to High-pass), they tend to leave residual white noise - you can remove it safely with additional low-pass above any useful signal. Software implementation is usually a lot more effective than what can be done in hardware - again, CPU can do at most 4th order IIR (with 24 db/octave roloff). Mixing 16 filtered voices together (8 per stereo channel) multiplies this residual noise again.

Ah and the delay can be switched off completely if needed, I'm sure you know that.

Looking forward to your samples - to be honest I can't very well imagine what you are trying to achieve as I lack experience working with DAWs - assumed there is enough tools in software world to do most of what a small HW synth can, and do it better - however the hardware surely allows for some interesting "happy accidents" :)